About Pirates Past Noon and Pirates: A Nonfiction Companion to Pirates Past Noon

In Pirates Past Noon, Jack and Annie are in deep trouble when the Magic Tree House whisks them back to the days of desert islands, secret maps, hidden gold--and ruthless pirates! Will Jack and Annie discover a buried treasure? Will they find out the identity of the mysterious M? Or will they walk the plank?

What were pirates really like? How did people become pirates? Where did pirates bury their treasure? Dig up the answers to these questions and more in Pirates: A Nonfiction Companion to Pirates Past Noon, Jack and Annie’s very own guide to pirates. Includes information onpirate flags, pirate treasure, real-life pirates, walking the plank, and much more!


Classroom Connections

Activities for Pirates Past Noon

  • Decorate a shoe box with paints and other materials to resemble a pirates treasure chest. Fill with "treasures" that might be found in Captain Kidd's chest.

  • Create Jolly Roger Pirate flags with black/white construction paper or felt. Attach to a wooden rod for "hoisting."

    Curriculum:

    • Language Arts

Activities for Pirates: A Nonfiction Companion to Pirates Past Noon

  • Will the Real Buccaneer Please Stand?

    Have students research true facts about pirates. Then have them write those facts and some nonfacts-or legends-about pirates on separate strips of paper, marking them "F" for fact or "L" for legend. Place the strips in a treasure chest and ask three students to pick slips from the chest and read each aloud. Have the class vote on who they felt presented the most true pirate facts.

    Curriculum:

    • Language Arts

  • "X" Marks the Spot!

    Discuss the significance of grids and how the pirates would have benefited from using a grid when locating buried treasures. Provide students with their own grids and have each of them draw an imaginary island. Have them draw objects that would be on the island, including an "X" to mark the spot of a treasure chest. With a partner, students can play a modified form of the board game Battleship, where they try to locate the different objects on their opponent's island. Or, collect and then randomly pass out the islands to the class. Have each student give the coordinates of the items drawn on the island that they were given.

    Curriculum:

    • Social Studies
    • Map Skills

  • Shiver Me Timbers!

    Study the chapter "Pirate Ships". Have students draw and label the parts of a sailing ship. Reference pages 62 and 63. Discuss why pirates would be attracted to their type of sailing ship (sloops, schooners, brigantines, or barques). Display the ships from least to greatest masts.

    Curriculum:

    • Language Arts

  • Knot so Fast

    Pirates sailed the seas and had to be good sailors in order to attack other ships and gain control of them. To be quick and efficient for their surprise attacks, they mastered knot tying to keep the sails up. Students can learn how to make different kinds of knots. Use this link to untie the secret of knot tying: http://www.realknots.com/knots/index.htm
    Assign each student a different type of knot to learn to tie and provide string. After the students have learned the art of tying their knot, they can teach a classmate how to do it.

    Curriculum:

    • Language Arts


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Teaching ideas provided by Jamay Johnson, second grade teacher, and Melinda Murphy, media specialist, Reed Elementary School, Cypress Fairbranks Independent School District, Houston, Texas.



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